2021 Archived Content

Cambridge EnerTech's

Battery Engineering Symposium

Building Better Batteries

19 - 20 January 2021 ALL TIMES CET

Battery engineers work to create high-energy, cost-effective, and reliable battery cells and packs that fully utilize the battery’s chemistry. To meet these standards, engineers must consider battery materials, cell engineering, mechanical, electrical, and thermal design and the integration of packs, as well as output, safety, and durability of the key designs. The Battery Engineering Symposium will bring together engineering representatives from top OEM companies, the battery supply chain, and top academic institutions to discuss the recent advancements in battery technology. It will encompass both cell and pack engineering, along with their safety concerns and how advancements in these areas are not only building better batteries, but safer and more robust ones.

Tuesday, 19 January

BATTERY SAFETY

09:00

Safety Implications of Emissions from Li-Ion Batteries

Natalia Lebedeva, PhD, Scientific Project Officer, Energy Storage, European Commission

Emissions of gases, liquids and solids from Li-ion batteries under various conditions, including battery fire, are outlined. Potential implications on safety of electric vehicles and road infrastructure are discussed.

09:20

Battery Safety and Performance Testing from a Policy Perspective

Andreas Pfrang, Scientific Officer, Joint Research Center, European Commission

The Joint Research Centre's battery testing laboratory in Petten, NL assesses battery safety and performance tests also for providing technical evidence for legislative purposes. Technical support includes, e.g., the development of a thermal propagation test procedure for electric vehicle safety or assessment of possible options for evaluation of sustainability of batteries. An overview of JRC's battery testing activities is given and selected findings on battery safety and performance are presented.

09:40

Battery Failure Behaviour: Abuse Testing under Varying Crush Speed

Bhavya Kotak, Research Associate, Safe Electromobility, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt

Despite various standards available for Electric Vehicle (EV) battery testing, there have been few severe accidents noticed recently which has resulted in some reservations by the EV consumer, hindering the deployment of the EV. Therefore, it is essential to experimentally investigate the speed at which batteries are crushed in an EV to identify its failure behaviour and look into the safety of EV consumer and the need for the harmonisation of multifarious globally available standards.

10:00 Session Break - View Our Virtual Exhibit Hall
10:20

Quantitative Degradation Diagnostic: A Differential Model

Jingyi Chen, PhD, Research Associate, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College London

Monitoring the battery health is important for predicting lifetime and optimising power. Often battery health is gauged by the capacity fade. However, degradation mechanisms of batteries are complex and cannot be sufficiently represented by a single figure of merit. We investigated using differential voltage (DV, dV/dQ) and incremental capacity (IC, dQ/dV) to calculate the extent of losses in lithium inventory (LLI) and active materials (LAM), in anode and cathode. The model provides a time-efficient method for on-board diagnostics with simplified parameterisations.


10:40

Thermal Runaway: Enhancing Battery System Safety for New Legal Requirements

Michael Harenbrock, Principal Expert, Engineering Electric Mobility, MANN+HUMMEL GmbH

In Thermal Runaways, gas released from battery cells can lead to catastrophic fires. The presentation will highlight how the release of hot, metallic particles from destroyed cell cans can be captured by function-added venting units, thus preventing ignition. An outlook will be given on future evolution of venting units and Thermal Runaway detection by sensor technology. These solutions are essential to enable passengers to safely exit the car before explosions and fires happen.

Arian Esfehanian, Technical Consulting Manager, Product Development & Management, ONEJOON GmbH

As price, quality and carbon footprint are playing an increasingly important role in the future of e-mobility, new kiln concepts are needed to reach these targets. The currently available kilns cannot provide the required performance for the heat treatment of the electrode raw materials (cathode or anode) or even solid-state battery systems.

See how Onejoon’s advanced kiln concepts provide revolutionary improvements in the heat treatment technology of cathode, anode, and solid electrolyte material systems. They help manufacturers to not only improve the quality, but also to reduce production costs by increasing capacity and saving energy and raw materials. You will also get insight on how we use simulations and production intend trials to define a suitable scale up concept for newly developed materials to get from lab to industrial scale production.

11:40 MODERATED Q&A:

Session Wrap-Up

Panel Moderator:
Michael Harenbrock, Principal Expert, Engineering Electric Mobility, MANN+HUMMEL GmbH
Panelists:
Natalia Lebedeva, PhD, Scientific Project Officer, Energy Storage, European Commission
Andreas Pfrang, Scientific Officer, Joint Research Center, European Commission
Bhavya Kotak, Research Associate, Safe Electromobility, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt
Jingyi Chen, PhD, Research Associate, Faculty of Engineering, Imperial College London
Arian Esfehanian, Technical Consulting Manager, Product Development & Management, ONEJOON GmbH
Axel Weiand, Vice President, Sales, New Business, ONEJOON GmbH
12:10 Session Break - View Our Virtual Exhibit Hall

BMS & SMARTER BATTERIES

13:00

Can Advanced Lithium-Ion Cell Production Data Simplify BMS Modeling?

Benno Leuthner, Custom Cells Itzehoe GmbH

Basic monitoring of the BMS is carried out by derived measurements during the validation of battery cells after development. The wide range of customer-specific and geographical usage profiles can only be tested or simulated in advance to a limited extent. For a comprehensive performance or health status, further metrics from the current cell state or effects from tolerable deviations from the target value during production and development are needed.

13:20

Available Discharge Power of Non-Aqueous Electrochemical Energy Storage Cells vs. Discharge Current

Christoph Nebl, Tech Head of Institute C ECOS Carissma, Safe Electromobility Research Group, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt

Knowing the basic characteristics of a cell with just a few current and voltage measurements enables us to answer the fundamental questions of battery system developers. The self-developed empirical equation allows easy determination of the available discharge power of lithium-ion batteries that helps to design and check the suitability as energy storage systems, e.g., for hybrid electric vehicles. Even if all the project- and application-specific parameters are not sufficiently defined, the equation allows a fast and cost-effective feasibility study on technical conditions such as vehicle range.

Yessica Brachthäuser, PhD, Application Engineer, Leak Detection Tools, INFICON GmbH

Valuable customer feedback and intensive cooperation with research institutes were used for further development of INFICON’s ELT3000 leak tester for hard case and pouch lithium ion battery cells. Within this presentation, we will briefly remind the working principle of direct electrolyte leak testing before focusing on the integration of the leak detector into production areas and showing real test data from the field.

14:00 Session Break - View Our Virtual Exhibit Hall

THERMAL MANAGEMENT

14:20

Battery Thermosiphon Refrigerant Cooling

Leila Sharifian, PhD, Manager, Advanced Powertrain, Toyota Motor Europe

MBD applied for efficient development, design & optimization of cooling systems. An innovative 0D/1D model developed to predict two-phase flow separation. Battery temperature is estimated in different conditions.

14:40

Thermal Management of Lithium-Ion Batteries

Gregory J. Offer, PhD, Senior Lecturer Mechanics of Materials, Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London

Cooling batteries effectively is essential for safety, and can improve performance & lifetime, and reduce cost. We will show how most batteries are designed poorly, how a simple measurement the Cell Cooling Coefficient can be used to compare cells, and how cells & packs should be designed in the future. Results from a recent Faraday Institution project on cell design will also be presented.

15:00

Keep It Cool! – A Thermal Simulation Study of the TESLA Model 3 Cell

Michael Schoenleber, Co-Founder & CTO, Batemo GmbH
15:20

Electro-Thermo-Mechanical Behaviours of Laser Joints for Electric Vehicle Battery Interconnects

Anup Barai, Assistant Professor, Energy & Electrical Systems Group, University of Warwick

An automotive battery pack used in electric vehicle (EV) comprises several hundred to a few thousand of individual Lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells when cylindrical cells are used to build the battery pack. These cells are connected in series and/or parallel to deliver the required power and capacity to achieve the designed vehicle driving range. This triggers the need for suitable joining methods capable of providing mechanical strength together with the required electrical and thermal performances.

16:00 MODERATED Q&A:

Session Wrap-Up

Panel Moderator:
Michael Schoenleber, Co-Founder & CTO, Batemo GmbH
Panelists:
Christoph Nebl, Tech Head of Institute C ECOS Carissma, Safe Electromobility Research Group, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt
Yessica Brachthäuser, PhD, Application Engineer, Leak Detection Tools, INFICON GmbH
Benno Leuthner, Custom Cells Itzehoe GmbH
Leila Sharifian, PhD, Manager, Advanced Powertrain, Toyota Motor Europe
Gregory J. Offer, PhD, Senior Lecturer Mechanics of Materials, Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London
Anup Barai, Assistant Professor, Energy & Electrical Systems Group, University of Warwick
16:50 Interactive Roundtable Discussions - View Our Virtual Exhibit Hall

Join your colleagues and fellow delegates for a focused, informal discussion moderated by a member of our speaking faculty. A small group format allows participants to meet potential collaborators, share examples from their own work and discuss ideas with peers.

ROUNDTABLE 1: Basic Science Research and Advanced Lead Batteries for Automotive Energy Storage Systems Batteries

Matthew Raiford, Manager, Consortium For Battery Innovation
  • Overview of recently analyzed lead battery performance data from 12V start-stop and micro-hybrid applications and 48V mild-hybrid applications
  • Future battery science developments in line with the new CBI Technical Program and their potential application for future vehicles
  • How do the energy cost per mile compare? What are the infrastructure cost per mile compare?
  • How is research in lead batteries improving key features such as functional safety and extreme temperature performance and durability?
  • What are the prospects for the future?

    ROUNDTABLE 2: Battery Pack System Cost and Safety - Will Future xEV Battery Packs Increase in Complexity or Simplify and How Will Cost and Safety Be Impacted?

    Kevin Konecky, Battery and Energy Storage System Consultant, Total Battery Consulting
    • How will pack designs change to mitigate the increased failure modes of Nickel-rich chemistries?
    • What materials might be added to increase safety?
    • i.e. thermal event mitigation materials
    • Will BMS designs increase or decrease in complexity?
    • Redundancy for functional safety or de-contented BMS similar to NiMH?
    • What system-level (non-cell) cost reductions are possible for 2025? 

      ROUNDTABLE 3: Li-Ion Cell Design and Manufacturing: Processes, Equipment and Quality Control

      James Kaschmitter, CEO, SpectraPower LLC
      • Experiences and lessons-learned in building and operating Li-Ion battery manufacturing plants
      • Which cell format is the most manufacturable: cylindrical, prismatic or pouch?
      • What are the key challenges for manufacturing large format (vs. small format) cells?
      • How cell design can impact manufacturing processes, yields and quality contro
      • Which areas of the manufacturing process are most difficult to implement?
      • What quality control disciplines are most efficient and effective (Six-Sigma, etc)?
      • Choosing. qualifying and managing equipment and material vendors
      • Is it feasible to go straight from prototype to high volume manufacturing?
      • Managing Engineering Changes
      • Managing and reducing cell manufacturing costs
      • What are the safety risks during manufacturing and how can we handle these risks?    

      ROUNDTABLE 4: How Can Calorimetry Help in Battery Research?

      Carlos Ziebert, PhD, Head of Calorimeter Ctr, Thermophysics & Thermodynamics Grp, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
      • What different types of calorimeters can be used for battery research?
      • What different tests can be performed?
      • What results can be obtained from calorimetry to improve cell performance, BMS, TMS or safety?
      • What are the current limits of calorimetry in battery research?
      • Who is already using calorimetry for battery research?
      17:50 Close of Day

      Wednesday, 20 January

      09:00

      Low Resistance Negative Electrodes for Fast Charging Lithium-Ion Batteries

      Martin Ebner, PhD, CEO, Battrion AG
      09:20

      Multi-Purpose Traction Motors for Integrated Charging Technology in Electric Vehicles

      Narayan Kar, Professor, Electrical & Computing Engineering, University of Windsor

      Integrated charging technology in electric vehicles employs existing motor powertrain components to facilitate level-3 fast battery charging capabilities with reduction in overall weight and cost of the vehicle resulting in improved driving range per charge. This beneficial feature is propelling research and development activities towards designing a high-performing, compact and cost-effective multi-purpose traction motor for integrated charging application.

      09:40

      Investigation of the Effects of Cell Aging on Thermal Behavior and Safety Using Battery Calorimeters

      Carlos Ziebert, PhD, Head of Calorimeter Ctr, Thermophysics & Thermodynamics Grp, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

      In order to prevent safety hazards, extensive research is undertaken to determine the causes of thermal runaway, as well as the influencing factors. In the last nine years, we have established battery calorimetry as a versatile characterization technique, which allows advancements for the thermal management and the safety of batteries. The primary purpose of this work was to perform a comprehensive calendaric and cylic ageing study with 116 commercial 18650 cells to determine the correlation between cell aging and the thermal runaway.

      Wei-Ting Yeh, Senior Manager, BENQ MATERIALS CORPORATION

      The power density of lithium-ion batteries has increased significantly — from 5,000 to more than 10,000 W/Kg per cell — due to demands from the HEV market. 

      Given that the internal impedance of the separator affects the battery charge/discharge performance, we will be revealing an eco-friendly patented separator structure which can effectively reduce 10% of DCR and increase battery performance. 

      10:40 MODERATED Q&A:

      Session Wrap-Up

      Panel Moderator:
      Martin Ebner, PhD, CEO, Battrion AG
      Panelists:
      Narayan Kar, Professor, Electrical & Computing Engineering, University of Windsor
      Carlos Ziebert, PhD, Head of Calorimeter Ctr, Thermophysics & Thermodynamics Grp, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
      Wei-Ting Yeh, Senior Manager, BENQ MATERIALS CORPORATION
      11:10 Session Break - View Our Virtual Exhibit Hall
      11:30 Close of Battery Engineering Symposium

      PLENARY KEYNOTE SESSION PANEL: EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

      11:45 Plenary Solutions Theatre (Sponsorship Opportunities Available)

      This panel session will feature a series of short podium presentations on emerging technologies and industry perspectives in vehicle electrification. Each speaker will have 7-8 minutes to present. After all speakers have presented, there will be a moderated Q&A between the speakers and attendees. The presentations are not meant to be a corporate or specific product pitch. Each speaker will focus on a technology and solution framed around a problem or issue related to the expanding market of advanced vehicles and how their organization is solving it.

      Thomas Fine, Global Market Manager Battery, High Performance Polymers, Arkema

      Inside and outside the battery cell, Arkema has the market leading technology portfolio of specialty materials for battery systems to increase efficiency, safety and reliability. Despite the impressive progress in lithium ion energy storage technologies achieved today, the challenges faced by battery systems remain significant in terms of energy densities, cost optimization and improved safety performance and durable cycle life. Our solutions help to optimize a better performance and improve the battery energy density, duration, weight reduction and recharging time.  Our market-leading portfolio of solutions for battery cover applications inside and outside the cell, from cell to module and battery pack assembly up to battery system integration into the vehicle. We offer you a 360° view on Arkema Battery Solutions in few minutes.

      Neil Collins, PhD, Technology Director, Battery Materials, Johnson Matthey

      A global leader in sustainable technologies, JM’s vision is for a world that is cleaner and healthier today and for future generations. By applying cutting edge science, Johnson Matthey Battery Materials are creating solutions together with customers that make a real difference to the world around us. Our commitment meeting customer needs is illustrated by our long-term experience in Life Power® LFP manufacturing, Fuel-cell Technology and Johnson Matthey's 40+ years of serving the autocatalyst industry.

      Stella Deheryan, Application Manager, Emerging Technologies, JSR Micro NV

      JSR is a research-oriented organization that pursues close collaborations with leading innovators in a number of industries that are key to the present and future welfare of human society: energy storage, life sciences, electronic materials, display and optical materials. In the energy storage field JSR provides high quality aqueous binders, paving the way to environmental-friendly and cost-effective manufacturing. Our water based binders have superior adhesion and can be used in lower concentrations leading to increased battery rate and cycle life performance. JSR has aqueous binders suited for both anode and cathode chemistries. Our products have excellent compatibility with materials for new generation Ni-rich cathodes and high energy anodes.

      Sandeep Unnikrishnan, Program Manager, High Performance Batteries, Holst Centre

      Interfacial engineering is seen as the key to enable more reliable and durable Li-ion batteries. A stable artificial SEI on the high-voltage cathode side and on the anode side are crucial for long-term cyclability of the battery. Compared to pre-passivation of active materials, post-passivation of electrode foils has the benefit of lower interfacial electronic impedance. In this presentation, an innovative high throughput scalable technology will be presented that can do atmospheric pressure, gas-phase passivation of electrode foils for next-generation battery applications.

      Peter Kritzer, rer. nat., E-Mobility & Batteries, Freudenberg FST GmbH

      Increased energy density on cell & system level as well as new trends of "Super Charging" result in greater safety challenges. The presentation will show two system components designed to contribute to the improvement of battery safety: a) DIAvent - Overpressure valves with reversible capabilities. and b) Heat Shields - thermal barriers counteracting thermal propagation as well as mechanically balancing the cell modules. Additional innovative concepts will be explored aimed to enhance the safety of future battery systems. To best achieve the targets of each individual battery system, it is highly recommended that specific joint development is needed.

      12:40 MODERATED Q&A:

      Session Wrap-Up

      Panel Moderator:
      Brian Barnett, PhD, President, Battery Perspectives
      Panelists:
      Sandeep Unnikrishnan, Program Manager, High Performance Batteries, Holst Centre
      Peter Kritzer, rer. nat., E-Mobility & Batteries, Freudenberg FST GmbH
      Stella Deheryan, Application Manager, Emerging Technologies, JSR Micro NV
      Neil Collins, PhD, Technology Director, Battery Materials, Johnson Matthey
      Thomas Fine, Global Market Manager Battery, High Performance Polymers, Arkema
      13:05 Session Break - View Our Virtual Exhibit Hall




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