2016 Archived Content

Track 2

Fuel Cell Technology and Applications

June 15-17, 2016 | Cobo Center | Detroit, Michigan

Part of the 16th Annual Advanced Automotive Battery Conference

 

Reducing cost and increasing durability are the greatest technical barriers to the development of widely available fuel cell vehicles. This conference track will focus on the technical advancements, strategies for commercialization and regulatory updates from the key government, academic and industry stakeholders involved in fuel cell systems development for automotive applications. This session will cover the entire fuel cell ecosystem, from advanced materials and component development to innovations in fuels and infrastructure. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear the latest developments from these key players within the industry on how they are achieving success.

Final Agenda


Arrive Early and Attend a Tutorial or Symposium

Monday Tutorials

 
 

8:30am – 10:30am

Rechargeable Battery Market (TUT1)

11:00am – 1:00pm

Solid State Electrolytes (TUT2)

3:00pm – 5:00pm

Battery Safety (TUT4)

Tuesday - Wednesday Symposia

Battery Chemistry (S1)

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15

12:00 pm Conference Registration Open

12:20 Networking Lunch

1:05 Dessert Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing


OPENING PLENARY SESSION: xEVs: Vehicle and Battery Market Expansion

2:00 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Menahem Anderman, Ph.D., President, Total Battery Consulting

2:05 Vehicle Electrification: Challenges and Opportunities

Kevin Layden, Director, Electrified Powertrain Engineering, Ford Motor Company

Regulations and restrictions on ICE emissions including CO2, particulates and other tailpipe emissions are in place promoting the introduction of electrified vehicles and requiring increased options from manufacturers. However, oil price has reached a 13-year low. To enable expansion of xEVs, the battery industry must not only continue to deliver the cost, weight, energy, and power density improvements it has demonstrated over the past decade, but it must go further and work with its partners to enhance features that batteries can provide exclusively. This will make electrified vehicles the consumers’ first choice.

2:25 Electric Vehicles: Current Status and Future View of Nissan

Yasuharu Watanabe, General Manager, EV and HEV Battery Engineering Department, Nissan Motor Company

This presentation will introduce future possibility and engineering direction of Nissan Electric vehicle, which realize the long driving range by battery evolution. It will also introduce the field data and customers’ opinions through the experiences of over 200,000 vehicles of the Nissan LEAF, which was released in December of 2010.

2:45 Toyota’s Electrification Roadmap

Michael Lord, Executive Engineer, Vehicle Regulation and Certification Engineering, Toyota Technical Center, Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing NA

The presentation will discuss Toyota’s electrification plan. In the short term, continued improvement and propagation of hybrid technology, including the expansion of plug-in hybrids, will provide the greatest benefits for C02 reduction. For full electric drive, Toyota is focused on the launch of the Mirai Fuel Cell Vehicle and believes that fuel cell vehicles have the greatest potential for use as general purpose household cars and large vehicles. For limited-range city vehicles, battery EVs could fit the requirement.

3:05 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

4:00 xEV Expansion, Technology and Market Outlook

Menahem Anderman, Ph.D., President, Total Battery Consulting

In this presentation, electrified-vehicle market expansion and battery technology and market development from micro-hybrids to full EVs will be discussed. As for battery technology, the key challenge is to enhance performance—to ease battery packaging in the car and reduce cost, while maintaining or improving durability, reliability, and safety.

4:30 Analysis of xEV/LIB Market Trends and Findings from the Tear-down Program of xEV

Takeshi Miyamoto, Senior Vice President, B3 Corporation

4:50 Hybrids Versus Diesel and Other Technologies, Including Impact of Recent NOx Scandal

John German, Senior Fellow, ICCT

The presentation will discuss test versus real life CO2 and pollutant emission of various advanced vehicle architectures, including advanced gasoline and diesel, hybrids, plug in hybrids, full battery, and Fuel Cell EVs. Improvements in conventional technologies and hybrids, and their impacts on paths to low CO2, will also be assessed.

5:10 Q&A


5:30 Networking Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing



7:00 Close of Day

THURSDAY, JUNE 16

9:00 Continental Breakfast Roundtable Discussions

Join your colleagues and fellow delegates over breakfast for a focused, informal discussion moderated by a member of our speaking faculty. A small group format allows participants to meet potential collaborators, share examples from their own work and discuss ideas with peers. Click here to see the full listing of topics and moderators.

10:00 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

11:00 Chairperson’s Opening Remarks

Alan Lloyd, Ph.D., President Emeritus, International Council on Clean Transportation; Senior Research Fellow, Energy Institute, University of Texas at Austin


11:05 OPENING KEYNOTE PANEL DISCUSSION: Overcoming the Barriers to Achieving Low Cost, High Durability and Performance for Automotive Applications

Moderator: Robert Bienenfeld, Assistant Vice President, Environment and Energy Strategy, American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
Panelists: Bill Elrick, Executive Director, California Fuel Cell Partnership
Shane Stephens, Ph.D., Chief Development Officer and Principal, FirstElement Fuel, Inc.

Reducing cost and increasing durability are the greatest technical barriers to the development of widely available fuel cell vehicles. This panel will focus on the technical advancements, strategies for commercialization and regulatory updates from the key government, academic and industry stakeholders involved in fuel cell systems development for automotive applications.


11:45 FC-PAD Consortium for Performance and Durability

Rod Borup, Ph.D., Program Manager, Fuel Cells, Los Alamos National Laboratory

The FC-PAD (Fuel Cell – Performance and Durability) consortium coordinates national laboratory activities related to fuel cell performance and durability, provides technical expertise, and integrate activities with industrial developers. Consortium members include Argonne National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This presentation will provide an update on the consortiums activities.

12:05 pm Membrane Electrode Assemblies for High-Temperature PEM Fuel Cells

Hans Aage Hjuler, Ph.D., Managing Director and CEO, Danish Power Systems

The work presented here focuses on recent results obtained by Danish Power Systems (DPS) regarding the degradation of PBI membranes used in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) under various operating conditions in addition to the latest developments on achieving an increased platinum utilization. Investigations on platinum cluster size and growth during fuel cell operation will also be presented.

12:25 pm Q&A

12:25 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

12:40 Networking Lunch



1:30 Dessert Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing




ADVANCED MATERIALS, COMPONENTS & SYSTEMS

2:15 Chairperson’s Remarks

James Fenton, Ph.D. , Director, Florida Solar Energy Center; Professor, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida

2:20 Prospects of Non-Noble Metal Catalysts for Fuel Cells

Sanjeev Mukerjee, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Director, Northeastern University Center for Renewable Energy Technology, Northeastern University

This presentation will provide a perspective in terms of our new results where our focus has been on non noble metal catalysts for fuel cell applications.

2:40 Manufacturing Considerations for Fuel Cell Components: Impact of Manufacturing on Gas Diffusion Layers Properties

François Girard, Ph.D., Thrust Leader – Fuel Cell Manufacturing, Vehicle Propulsion Technologies Program, National Research Council Canada/Government of Canada

Cost reduction for fuel cell vehicles depend on industrialization of the manufacturing processes and the development of a strong supply chain. This paper will discuss the characterization of gas diffusion layers in order to understand the influence of manufacturing processes, develop standard measurement methods for quality control and support the definition of specifications for this component.

3:00 Advances in MEA Development: Automotive Application, Low PGM, Durability, Materials by Design Approach

Madeleine Odgaard, CEO, IRD Fuel Cells, LLC, Denmark

The prime focus of the work presented is development of high-performing MEAs aimed for automotive applications through materials R&D and process optimization. The aim is to fulfill OEM requirements with respect to cost, performance and durability. Development of low-PGM-loading electrodes with catalysts based on stable support materials is addressed in the work.

3:20 Refreshment Break

3:40 Technology Development for Corrosion Resistant Metal Bipolar Plates for PEM Fuel Cell Stacks

Conghua Wang, Ph.D., Vice President and CTO, Treadstone Technologies

Metal bipolar plates have the advantage of lighter weight and smaller volume over graphite-based bipolar plates for automobile PEM fuel cell stacks. Low cost, corrosion resistant coating has to be developed to ensure the long term durability of metal bipolar plates in PEM fuel cell application conditions. In this presentation, various technologies will be reviewed, and the latest technology developed at TreadStone will be reported.

4:10 Fuel Cell Vehicles: Can We Avoid Another Hype Cycle?

Alan Lloyd, Ph.D., President Emeritus, International Council on Clean Transportation; Senior Research Fellow, Energy Institute, University of Texas at Austin

This paper will look behind the headlines to examine the commercialization plans of fuel cell passenger car manufacturers, and compare those plans against the expectations and needs of the regulatory community and governments. Nearly $1 billion has been committed to date to build fueling stations, and hydrogen is being increasingly pursued in other efforts to decarbonize the energy sector. Regulators are anxious for the benefits of FCVs to be realized but risks for full commercialization remain. What are they and can another hype cycle be avoided?

4:40 Q&A

5:00 Close of Day


FRIDAY, JUNE 17

8:30 am Morning Coffee


NEW VEHICLE DEVELOPMENT: ACHIEVING LOW COST, HIGH DURABILITY & PERFORMANCE

9:00 Chairperson’s Remarks

Sanjeev Mukerjee, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Director Northeastern University Center for Renewable Energy Technology, Northeastern University


9:05 KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Enabling Sustainable Mobility – The Toyota Mirai

Justin Ward, General Manager, Powertrain System Control Department, Toyota Technical Center, Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

Toyota is dedicated to offering our customers a diverse portfolio of solutions to address climate change, petroleum dependency and air quality. Included in the portfolio is the Toyota Mirai - a 300 mile all electric vehicle that refills with hydrogen in minutes. The in-house development of the Mirai spanned two decades and ran in parallel to the development of the Toyota Hybrid Synergy Drive system. Through various technical advancements and cost reductions the Mirai reached maturity for commercialization in 2015 demonstrating Toyota's innovation and commitment toward sustainable mobility.


9:25 Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Status and Recent Progress under the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Program

John Kopasz, Ph.D, Chemist, Argonne National Laboratory*

Fuel cell development has come a long way and the fuel cell market is growing, with the industry exceeding $2billion in sales in 2014. The status of fuel cell technology and results from recent DOE funded work will be reviewed and future targets and plans described. *With contributions from Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, Nancy Garland, Donna Lee Ho, U.S. Department of Energy

9:45 Remaining Technical Challenges in R&D for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - Diagnostic Analysis and Simulation

Shinichi Hirano, Principal Research Engineer, Fuel Cell Research, Ford Motor Company

Cost and durability are still significant challenges to the commercialization of automotive fuel cell technology. Significant R&D efforts to develop advanced fuel cell materials and cell concepts have been pursued. To fill the gap to the target, further R&D is necessary to fully develop advanced fuel cell technology. Improvement of performance in not only catalyst material activity but also other factors such as mass transport overpotential are critical. Therefore, research focus is extended from materials to cell characterization. The technical outlook and research approaches for the remaining challenges of automotive PEMFC's will be discussed.

10:05 Coffee Break


Innovations in Fuels, Distribution and Infrastructure

10:30 Analysis of the Current and Future Technologies for the Hydrogen Refueling Stations From Manufacturing Competitiveness and Supply Chain Perspectives

Ahhmad Mayyas, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Strategic Energy Analysis Center, NREL

This study focuses on the manufacturing cost and global supply chain analysis for hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) as the major part of the required hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles deployment. We collected/analyzed data from 335 HRS installations in the past 10 years and found that more government support is required in the coming years to spread the HRS’s to accommodate the increasing number of fuel cell vehicles.

10:50 Update on Fuel Cell Bus Technology and Infrastructure

Steve Sokolsky, Program Director, CALSTART

The U.S. Federal Transit Administration has invested substantial amounts to advance the use of fuel cells in transit buses. CALSTART was awarded funds to develop the American Fuel Cell Bus together with Ballard, BAE, and El Dorado. We will present a status report on AFCB deployments and next steps. CALSTART also recently completed a Best Practices in Hydrogen Fueling and Maintenance Facilities for Transit Agencies publication for the FTA.

11:10 Development of California’s Retail Hydrogen Network

Shane Stephens, Ph.D., Chief Development Officer and Principal, FirstElement Fuel Inc.

FCEVs represent the next-generation of zero emission automobile technology for reducing impact on energy and the environment without any compromise to the customer experience. FirstElement Fuel Inc. is developing the world’s first network for retail, customer-focused charging stations for fuel cell electric vehicles. The talk will outline FirstElement Fuel’s strategy and vision, as well as lessons learned during the process of launching our True Zero branded network of hydrogen chargers.

11:30 Q&A

11:50 Networking Lunch




APPLICATIONS IN FUEL CELL & BATTERY HYBRIDIZATION

1:20 pm Chairperson’s Remarks

Rod Borup, Ph.D., Program Manager, Fuel Cells, Los Alamos National Laboratory

1:25 How Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles are Addressing Transportation Challenges Today

Jennifer Kurtz, Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Systems Engineering Group Manager, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Transportation challenges such as GHG emissions and dependence on petroleum are drivers for NREL’s RD&D work with sustainable transportation technologies. A component of the all-of-the-above solution set for these transportation challenges are hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). NREL’s National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center is analyzing on-road FCEVs and disseminating current performance (e.g.durability, fuel economy, range, and fill time) and progress over time.

1:45 Development and Demonstration of Fuel Cell-Powered Transport Refrigeration Units for Refrigerated Trucks

Kriston Brooks, Chief Engineer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Replacing the diesel engine in a transport refrigeration unit (TRU) of a commercial refrigerated truck will result in improved efficiency, reduced noise, and a reduction in CO2 and criteria pollutant emissions. This presentation will provide a project update and describe the system development work, business case, and testing that has been performed.

2:05 Battery and Fuel Cell EVs, PV and Your Home

James Fenton, Ph.D. , Director, Florida Solar Energy Center, Professor, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida

There are over 20 models of electric vehicles that are so efficient they cost the gasoline equivalent of $0.99 a gallon to operate. An introduction will be provided to the concepts that allow the transportation and grid infrastructures to work together, so that PV, EVs and energy efficient buildings can significantly decrease our dependency on fossil fuels, mitigate climate change and increase energy and transportation security.

2:25 Q&A

2:40 Refreshment Break


CLOSING PLENARY SESSION: xEV INFRASTRUCTURE

2:55 Chairperson’s Remarks

Mark Duvall, Director, Electric Transportation and Energy Storage, Electric Power Research Institute

3:00 Status of FCEVs and H2 Infrastructure in California - The Challenges Met and What’s Next

Bill Elrick, Executive Director, California Fuel Cell Partnership

With fuel cell electric vehicles now commercially available and the California Roadmap and ZEV Action Plan documents as guidance, California is nearly half way to the 100 hydrogen station objective for initial commercial launch. This presentation will highlight the current status, progress made and priority activities for advancing the commercial market in California.

3:20 Charging Infrastructure Progress and Challenges

Mark Duvall, Director, Electric Transportation and Energy Storage, Electric Power Research Institute

3:40 Charging Infrastructure – Southern California Edison Experience

Jordan W. Smith, Engineering Manager Advanced Technology, Southern California Edison

Southern California Edison developed a program to install thousands of charging stations in long-term parking locations. SCE developed requirements for EVSE, and established a qualification process to select a pool of qualified EVSE. The requirements focus on hardware and controls. Equipment must have the capability to respond to standard utility DR signals, presenting a versatile asset which enables further electrification of transportation while managing grid system impact.

4:00 Q&A


4:20 Closing Remarks

4:30 Close of Conference